Rear-End Collisions and Insurance Claims: What to Know

A rear-end collision can be a frightening experience. Not only is your car damaged, but you may also be dealing with injuries. If you are not sure what to do after a rear-end collision, don’t worry.

The three primary things you need to know about insurance and rear-end collisions are:

You will likely need to file a claim with your insurance company, even if the other driver was at fault. Your rates may go up after a rear-end collision, even if you were not at fault. You may be able to recover damages from the other driver’s insurance.

This blog post will guide you through making an insurance claim. We will discuss the steps that you need to take to make sure that you get the compensation that you deserve.

Keep reading to learn everything that you need to know about insurance and rear-end collisions.

What Is Classified As A Rear-End Collision?

rear-end collision is, quite simply, a car crash where the front of one vehicle hits the back of another. Rear-end collisions are different from other kinds of car accidents because they often happen at lower speeds.

This means that the damage to your vehicle may not be as severe as it would be in a high-speed crash.

However, you may still be dealing with injuries such as whiplash. Whiplash is a neck injury when your head is suddenly jerked forward and backward. It can cause pain, stiffness, and headaches.

What Should You Do After A Rear-End Collision?

The first thing you need to do after any kind of car accident is to make sure that everyone involved is okay. If anyone is injured, call 911 right away. Once the police and ambulance have arrived, you can exchange information with the other driver.

You will need their name, contact information, insurance company, and policy number. You should also take pictures of the damage to both vehicles. These pictures will be helpful when you are making your insurance claim.

If the police are not called to the scene of the accident, you should still file a report with your local police department.

This is important because it will create an official record of the accident. This report can be used as evidence if there are any disputes about what happened later on.

How to File An Insurance Claim

After you have exchanged information with the other driver and taken pictures of the damage, you need to contact your insurance company. You should do this as soon as possible after the accident.

Your insurance company will then likely send an adjuster to assess the damage to your vehicle. The adjuster is an independent contractor who works for the insurance company. They will estimate how much it will cost to repair your car.

Once you have received the estimate from the adjuster, you can take your car to a mechanic to get it fixed. If you have any questions about what repairs are necessary, you can ask the mechanic. They will be able to tell you if anything on the estimate is not needed.

What If the Other Driver Was At Fault?

Even if the other driver was at fault, you would likely need to file a claim with your insurance company. This is because most insurance companies have what is called a collision deductible.

This means that you will have to pay a certain amount of money out-of-pocket before your insurance company starts paying for repairs.

For example, if your collision deductible is $500 and the damage to your car is $2000, you would need to pay the first $500, and then your insurance would cover the rest.

It is important to remember that just because the other driver was at fault, does not mean that their insurance company will automatically pay for all of the damage to your car. You may still need to pay your deductible.

What If the Other Driver Does Not Have Insurance?

If the other driver does not have insurance, you may be able to file a claim with your own insurance company. This is because most insurance companies offer uninsured motorist coverage.

This means that if you are in an accident with a driver who does not have insurance, your insurance company will help pay for the damage to your vehicle. They will also help pay for any medical bills that you incur as a result of the accident.

Keep in mind that there is often a deductible for this type of coverage. This means that you would need to pay a certain amount out-of-pocket before your insurance company would start paying for repairs.

Making A Claim Against the Other Driver

If the other driver was at fault and you cannot get them to pay for the damage to your car, you may need to file a lawsuit against them. This is called a personal injury lawsuit.

To do this, you would need to hire an attorney who specializes in personal injury cases. They will be able to help you gather evidence and build your case. If you win the lawsuit, the court may order the other driver to pay for the damage to your vehicle.

Keep in mind that filing a lawsuit can be time-consuming and expensive. It is often a good idea to try to negotiate with the other driver first. If you are unable to reach an agreement, then you can consider filing a lawsuit.

Your Rear-End Collision Dealt With the Right Way

Dealing with a rear-end collision can be stressful. However, it is essential to know what to do to ensure that everything is dealt with properly. Be sure to exchange information with the other driver, file a police report, and contact your insurance company immediately after the accident.

By following these steps, you can be sure that your rear-end collision will be dealt with in the best way possible. Get in touch with us now to get legal assistance with your situation.

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